Mastering Your Reality: Erik Weihenmayer

In every moment, you choose who you want to be and how you want to live your life. It’s your ultimate power, and your inescapable responsibility. You’re the master of your reality.

Erik Weihenmayer is an accomplished extreme athlete, speaker, author, and educator. Being the first blind climber to summit Mt. Everest wasn’t challenge enough for Erik, so he went on to climb the highest peak on each of the 7 continents, an accomplishment shared with less than 100 others! Erik’s latest book, No Barriers, shares his empowering life philosophy, and his organization of the same name aims to unleash the potential of the human spirit through transformative experiences.

In this episode of Mastering Your Reality, we discussed:

• “Don’t let climbing Everest be the greatest thing you ever do” was the greatest advice anyone ever gave Erik, he claims.

• Erik’s next adventure after the 7 summits was an 8 year journey into kayaking, finally kayaking the entire 277-miles of the Colorado River through the Grand Canyon.

• Kayaking in rapids or skiing down a mountain are difficult things to do even with sight, doing them without sight requires silencing your fear and anxiety.

• Fear comes natural to Erik, like everyone, but he has the unique ability to deal with his fear, allowing him to accomplish incredible goals.

• Isaac and Erik both deal with being underestimated because of their blindness, for example—assuming they require a wheel chair in airports or not being allowed to ride a children’s ride.

• Responding to these situations with anger does not achieve anything, and can lead to a missed opportunity to educate.

 

Want to learn more? Click here to read about Erik’s books, or click here to learn more about his organization. You can also click here to view more episodes of Mastering Your Reality.

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